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Can I overcome the lingering physical and emotional trauma caused by extreme hunger in my past, which now threatens to sabotage my progress in recovering from a major life crisis?

Extreme hunger is a normal response to malnutrition and starvation, not a sign of relapse or failure in eating disorder recovery.

The body's hunger-fullness cues can be disrupted by restrictive eating, leading to extreme hunger and overeating (Source: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics).

Eating calorie-dense foods can help regulate appetite and stabilize blood sugar levels, reducing extreme hunger (Source: American Diabetes Association).

Recognizing and challenging rigid food rules and restrictions can help alleviate extreme hunger (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders).

The brain's reward system is responsible for regulating food cravings, and extreme hunger can be a result of an imbalance in this system (Source: Nature Reviews Neuroscience).

The body's "set point" theory suggests that the body has a natural weight range it tries to maintain, and extreme hunger can be a result of deviation from this range (Source: International Journal of Obesity).

Extreme hunger can be accompanied by physical symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, and dizziness due to fluctuations in blood sugar levels (Source: Mayo Clinic).

Research suggests that eating disorders and trauma are closely linked, and addressing trauma can aid in recovery (Source: Journal of Clinical Psychology).

The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which regulates stress response, is often disrupted in individuals with eating disorders, leading to extreme hunger and cravings (Source: Psychoneuroendocrinology).

The gut-brain axis plays a crucial role in regulating appetite, satiety, and food cravings, and alterations in the gut microbiome can contribute to extreme hunger (Source: Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology).

Extreme hunger can be a result of leptin resistance, a hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite (Source: International Journal of Obesity).

The neural circuits involved in emotional regulation and reward processing are also involved in food cravings and extreme hunger (Source: Neuropsychopharmacology).

The phenomenon of "food neophobia," or fear of new foods, can contribute to extreme hunger and restrictive eating (Source: Journal of Food Science).

The role of cortisol, a hormone released in response to stress, is often overlooked in discussions of extreme hunger, but it can play a significant role in regulating appetite and metabolism (Source: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism).

The concept of "intuitive eating" emphasizes listening to internal hunger and fullness cues, which can help alleviate extreme hunger and promote a healthier relationship with food (Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders).

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