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"Do you ever experience hearing music that seems not to be present, as if it's just in your mind? What is this phenomenon called?"

Auditory hallucinations, including hearing music that isn't present, can be a symptom of various mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and PTSD.

People without a diagnosed mental health condition can also experience auditory hallucinations due to factors like sleep deprivation, fatigue, or certain medications.

Rare neurological conditions or injuries to the brain can cause auditory hallucinations, such as in cases of brain injuries or Charles Bonnet syndrome.

Treatment for auditory hallucinations depends on the underlying cause and may involve medication, therapy, or lifestyle changes.

Musical ear syndrome (MES) is a specific type of auditory hallucination where a person hears music that isn't present.

MES is usually due to a lack of auditory stimulation, often affecting elderly individuals with hearing loss.

People with MES are more likely to have tinnitus, anxiety, or depression.

MES can also affect people with normal hearing, especially in quiet environments when the brain "looks" for stimuli.

This phenomenon is known as auditory pareidolia, where one perceives patterns or sounds in random data.

High fevers, infections like encephalitis and meningitis, or intense stress can cause a person to hear things that aren't present.

Human brains are wired to remember musical associations and oral histories, which can lead to "stuck" connections and repetitive thoughts.

A study by Harvard researchers suggests that certain songs get stuck in our heads because of their musical and cognitive properties, not just personal associations.

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