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How can I identify and address the underlying factors causing post-recovery weight gain without compromising my health or previous progress?

The body's set point theory suggests that our bodies have a natural weight range, and weight gain in recovery can be a natural response to malnutrition and caloric deficit.

Leptin, a hormone that regulates energy balance and metabolism, can affect eating behavior and weight gain in individuals with a history of anorexia nervosa.

In early recovery, rapid weight gain can occur due to increased muscle mass, not just fat mass, as the body replenishes nutrient stores.

Hormonal changes, such as the increase in ghrelin (the "hunger hormone") and decrease in peptide YY (an anorectic hormone), can contribute to weight gain in eating disorder recovery.

Reduced muscle mass and bone density due to malnutrition can lead to a higher body mass index (BMI) at a lower weight, making weight gain more noticeable.

Emotional regulation, a skill often lacking in individuals with eating disorders, can affect food choices and portion control, leading to weight gain.

Eating disorder recovery often involves increased hunger and appetite due to the body's need to replenish nutrient stores, leading to weight gain.

Research suggests that individuals with anorexia nervosa tend to have altered reward processing in the brain, influencing food choices and weight gain.

Weight gain in recovery can be influenced by the body's adaptation to past dietary restrictions, leading to changes in eating habits and metabolic rate.

The " Restrictive Eating Dieting" cycle can lead to a higher set point weight, making weight gain more likely in recovery.

In eating disorder recovery, the body's need to replenish energy stores can lead to increased hunger and food intake, resulting in weight gain.

The gut microbiome, which is often altered in individuals with eating disorders, can influence metabolic rate, hunger, and weight gain.

Elevated cortisol levels, common in eating disorder individuals, can contribute to weight gain and fat redistribution.

Weight gain in recovery can be influenced by the body's natural response to refeeding, which can lead to increased insulin sensitivity and fat storage.

Research suggests that individualized calorie needs and nutrition plans can help mitigate excessive weight gain in eating disorder recovery.

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