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How can I identify if my eating habits are developing into an eating disorder, and what resources are available for support?

Eating disorders affect 9% of the global population, making them more prevalent than breast cancer, HIV, and Alzheimer's disease combined.

85% of people with eating disorders are not underweight, defying the common misconception that eating disorders only affect underweight individuals.

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental health condition, with anorexia nervosa having a mortality rate 5-6 times higher than the general population.

Only 1 in 10 individuals with an eating disorder receive appropriate treatment, despite the availability of effective treatments.

Genetics play a significant role in eating disorders, with 28-74% of people with a first-degree relative (parent or sibling) having an increased risk of developing an eating disorder.

The earliest recorded eating disorder was anorexia nervosa, described by English physician Richard Morton in 1689.

Eating disorders often co-occur with other mental health conditions, such as anxiety disorders (64%), depression (55%), and substance abuse (27%).

The majority (60-70%) of people with eating disorders also experience anxiety disorders, highlighting the importance of addressing comorbid mental health issues.

Eating disorders affect not only physical health but also cognitive function, with impaired attention, memory, and problem-solving abilities.

Individuals with eating disorders have altered brain structure and function, particularly in regions involved in emotion regulation, reward processing, and cognitive control.

The gut microbiome plays a crucial role in eating disorders, with altered microbial communities contributing to symptoms such as bloating and abdominal pain.

Eating disorders often begin as a way to cope with emotional trauma, with 70% of individuals with eating disorders reporting a history of traumatic experiences.

Social media use has been linked to an increased risk of developing eating disorders, particularly in adolescents and young adults.

Eating disorders can have long-term consequences, including infertility, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease, even after recovery.

Only 12% of individuals with eating disorders receive specialist treatment, highlighting the need for improved awareness, education, and access to care.

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