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Is it possible that a lower dosage of amphetamine could have therapeutic benefits for individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)?

Amphetamine, when used in lower doses, can have therapeutic benefits for individuals with ADHD.

The usual adult dose for narcolepsy and obesity is 10-30 mg per day, taken in divided doses.

For children, the dose must be determined by a doctor.

The dose can be adjusted by a doctor as needed, but the maximum dose is usually not more than 20 mg per day.

Lowering the dosage of amphetamine may lead to fewer side effects such as low or high blood pressure and Raynaud's phenomenon.

The usual pediatric dose for narcolepsy is 2.5-10 mg per day.

For children aged 6-11 years, the initial dose is 5 mg per day, with an increase of 5 mg every week until the optimal effect is achieved.

Amphetamine creates a calming effect for children diagnosed with ADHD by targeting the chemicals in their brain that transmit signals between nerves in the central nervous system.

Long-term use of ADHD medication, including amphetamines, can have side effects and risks, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, seizure, irregular heartbeat, abuse, and addiction.

Dextroamphetamine and amphetamine combination works by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, which improves attention, focus, and reduces impulsivity and hyperactivity.

The first dose of amphetamine should be given on awakening, with additional doses given at intervals of 4 to 6 hours, and late evening doses should be avoided.

Amphetamine tablets contain a mixture of dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine salts in a 3:1 ratio, and toxic symptoms can occur at doses as low as 2 mg.

The maximum daily dose of amphetamine for ADHD is 40 mg per day for adults and children over age 6.

For narcolepsy in adults, the dose can range from 5 to 60 mg per day.

The liver metabolizes amphetamines, and the medication can have a half-life of up to 14 hours.

Amphetamines can cause physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms, such as fatigue, depression, and increased appetite, when the medication is stopped.

Amphetamines can cause a euphoric effect, which can lead to abuse and addiction.

Amphetamines can cause an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Amphetamines can affect the levels of certain neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, in the brain.

Amphetamines can cause insomnia, irritability, and loss of appetite.

Amphetamines can cause psychological dependence and withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, and paranoia, when the medication is stopped.

Amphetamines can cause an increase in body temperature and dehydration.

Amphetamines can cause an increase in libido and sexual behavior.

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