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What are some practical steps I can take when I feel overwhelmed and stuck in life, and I don't know what to do anymore?

Human brains are wired to seek certainty and avoid uncertainty, which can make feeling overwhelmed and unsure of what to do particularly uncomfortable.

However, experiencing uncertainty is a common part of life and can lead to growth.

The concept of "flow" refers to a state of complete engagement and enjoyment in an activity, often characterized by a loss of sense of time.

The Zeigarnik effect is a psychological phenomenon in which individuals are more likely to remember incomplete or interrupted tasks than completed ones.

This can contribute to feelings of being overwhelmed, as unfinished tasks can linger in the mind.

Practicing mindfulness techniques, such as deep breathing and meditation, can help alleviate this.

Decision fatigue refers to the decreased cognitive ability to make decisions, often resulting from making too many decisions in a short period of time.

Prioritizing decisions by importance, delegating tasks, and setting time limits can help combat decision fatigue.

Parkinson's Law states that work expands to fill the time available for its completion.

Setting strict time limits for tasks can help increase productivity and efficiency.

The Pareto Principle, or the 80/20 rule, suggests that 80% of consequences come from 20% of causes.

Identifying and focusing on the most important tasks can help increase productivity and reduce feelings of being overwhelmed.

The concept of "marginal gains" is borrowed from the world of sports, and refers to the idea that small, incremental improvements in multiple areas can lead to significant overall improvement.

Applying this philosophy to daily life can help alleviate feelings of being overwhelmed and unsure of what to do.

The science of "growth mindset" suggests that viewing challenges and setbacks as opportunities for growth, rather than as failures, can foster resilience and improve coping mechanisms.

The "sunk cost fallacy" refers to the tendency to continue investing time and resources into an endeavor based on the amount already invested, rather than evaluating future potential returns.

Recognizing and avoiding the sunk cost fallacy can help individuals make more rational decisions and avoid feelings of being overwhelmed.

The "backwards law" suggests that the more one consciously tries to achieve something, the more it eludes them.

Instead, focusing on the process and taking small steps can increase the likelihood of achieving a desired outcome.

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