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What are the most effective ways to alleviate the physical discomfort associated with anxiety and stress?

Emotional pain can be physically painful due to the brain processing emotional and physical pain similarly, involving the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus.

The neurotransmitters triggered by emotional pain, such as serotonin, GABA, glutamate, and norepinephrine, are similar to those triggered by physical pain.

The experience of emotional pain can be intense and overwhelming, making it hard to focus on anything else, similar to walking around with a broken heart every day.

Putting a name to what you're feeling may offer relief, as putting feelings into words can help alleviate emotional pain.

Emotional pain can contribute to feelings of physical discomfort and pain, and in some cases, can even have serious health effects.

Brain regions associated with psychological pain overlap with those associated with physical pain, implying a neural network connection.

Traumatic events can challenge an individual's view of the world as a just, safe, and predictable place, leading to emotional pain.

Mental illnesses can cause a range of physical symptoms, including muscle tension, pain, headaches, insomnia, and more.

The phenomenon of emotional pain causing physical symptoms has been documented in much research, and is magnified when under high levels of stress.

A new understanding of the link between emotions and physical pain is helping identify the root causes of our pain and why physical and emotional pain often coexist.

The experience of emotional pain can be so intense it can feel like being physically ill, causing vomiting and other physical symptoms.

Falling in love can feel intense, but severing that emotional connection can trigger physical pain due to the overlap of brain regions involved in processing physical and emotional pain.

Neuroimaging studies have shown that brain regions involved in processing physical pain overlap with those involved in emotional pain, explaining why heartbreak can literally hurt.

The parts of the brain involved in emotional pain, such as the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus, are also active during physical pain.

Emotional pain can be more relevant to us than physical pain, as the brain prioritizes emotional pain as a threat to our well-being.

The brain's neural network connection between emotional and physical pain can contribute to feelings of discomfort and pain.

Becoming aware and reassessing negative thoughts can help alleviate emotional pain by putting feelings into words.

Sadness, anger, anxiety, shame, and guilt can all play a role in the experience of emotional pain, affecting the body.

Research suggests that emotional pain may be more relevant to us than physical pain, as the brain processes emotional pain similarly to physical pain.

The experience of emotional pain can be so overwhelming it can make daily life feel like too much to handle, leading to feelings of despair and hopelessness.

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