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What are the potential causes and symptoms of developing depression, and how does it differ from feeling temporary sadness or low moods?

Depression is not simply feeling sad or having a bad day; it is a chronic and potentially life-threatening condition that requires medical attention.

Genetics can play a role in depression, as those with a family history of the condition may be more susceptible to developing it.

Stressful life events, such as the loss of a loved one or financial difficulties, can trigger depressive episodes.

Approximately 5% of adults worldwide experience depression, with women being more likely to be affected than men.

Major life changes, such as pregnancy or entering one's 30s, can also increase the risk of developing depression.

Vitamin B and D deficiencies have been linked to an increased risk of depression.

Unlike temporary sadness, the symptoms of depression must be present for at least two weeks to receive a diagnosis.

Depression can interfere with daily activities, including work and personal relationships.

Severe cases of depression can lead to psychosis symptoms, such as delusions or hallucinations.

Bipolar disorder, which involves depressive episodes as well as manic episodes, is a related but distinct condition from depression.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that occurs during specific seasons, often the winter months.

Vascular depression, which may manifest in paranoia, aggressive tendencies, apathy, and slowed movement, is associated with a history of hypertension or high blood pressure.

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