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What is considered bingeing by most people, and how many episodes or hours constitute a binge-watching session?

The term "binge-watching" was coined in the early 2000s, as on-demand television and streaming services became more popular.

A 2015 study by the UK's Royal Society for Public Health found that people who binge-watch TV shows report higher levels of stress, anxiety, and depression.

The average binge-watching session lasts for 2-3 hours, and viewers often watch 3-6 episodes of a show in one sitting.

In 2021, a survey by Cordcutting.com found that 47% of respondents considered watching 4 or more episodes of a show in one sitting to be binge-watching.

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology in 2018 found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have difficulty controlling their impulses and emotions in other areas of their lives.

According to a survey by Netflix in 2017, the most common time for binge-watching is on Sunday evenings, with 22% of respondents reporting that they watch an average of 5 episodes in one sitting during this time.

A 2016 study by the University of Texas at Austin found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have a higher body mass index (BMI) and engage in other unhealthy behaviors such as smoking and excessive drinking.

In 2020, a survey by Deloitte found that 71% of people worldwide binge-watch TV shows at least once a week.

In a 2019 study by the University of Melbourne, researchers found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to suffer from poor sleep quality and insomnia.

In 2022, a survey by Nielsen found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to prefer streaming services over traditional cable or satellite TV.

A study published in the Journal of Health Psychology in 2017 found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have lower self-esteem and higher levels of loneliness.

According to a 2018 survey by Common Sense Media, teenagers are more likely to binge-watch TV shows than adults, with 71% of teens reporting that they binge-watch at least once a week.

In a 2021 study by the University of California, San Diego, researchers found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have impaired cognitive function and memory loss.

A 2020 study by the University of Michigan found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have a less active social life and feel more socially isolated.

In a 2019 survey by the American Psychological Association, 80% of respondents reported feeling guilty or ashamed after binge-watching TV shows.

A 2018 study by the University of Pennsylvania found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety.

In a 2021 study by the University of Southern California, researchers found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have a sedentary lifestyle and engage in less physical activity.

A 2019 study by the University of California, Berkeley, found that people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have impaired decision-making skills and exhibit risky behavior.

In a 2020 survey by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 62% of respondents reported that binge-watching TV shows increased their feelings of anxiety and depression.

According to a 2021 study by the University of California, Los Angeles, people who binge-watch TV shows are more likely to have impaired emotional regulation and difficulty managing their emotions.

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