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"What should I do if I had a major panic attack for the first time in my life?"

Panic attacks can be mistaken for heart attacks due to the intense physical symptoms they can cause, such as rapid heart rate, chest pain, and shortness of breath.

The exact cause of panic attacks is not fully understood, but they are believed to result from a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors.

Panic attacks often occur in clusters, meaning that multiple attacks can happen in a short period of time.

People who have panic disorder may experience anticipatory anxiety, which is a constant fear or worry about having another panic attack.

Deep breathing exercises can help reduce the symptoms of a panic attack by slowing the heart rate and promoting relaxation.

Panic attacks are more likely to occur in people with a family history of panic disorder or other anxiety disorders.

People who experience panic attacks may avoid certain situations or places due to fear of having another attack, leading to a condition known as agoraphobia.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can help individuals identify and challenge negative thoughts that contribute to panic attacks.

Medications such as benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can be used to prevent or treat panic attacks.

Panic attacks can occur at any age, but they are most commonly experienced by people in their late teens and early adulthood.

People who have experienced a panic attack should consider seeking professional help from a mental health provider or a medical doctor.

Recurrent panic attacks and significant distress or impairment may be indicative of panic disorder, which is a treatable condition.

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