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Are companies still using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) in their hiring processes, and is it an effective tool for identifying top talent?

The MBTI has no scientific basis, and many experts consider it to be a pseudoscience.

Despite this, 88% of companies in 115 countries use the MBTI in their hiring processes.

The Myers-Briggs Company itself advises against using the MBTI for hiring, warning that it may be unethical to use the test in this way.

The MBTI is a massive industry, reportedly making $20 million annually.

The test has been widely debunked as having no scientific basis, yet it continues to be used extensively in professional settings.

Consulting firms like McKinsey famously use the test during the application process.

The MBTI assumes that personality traits are fixed, which can unfairly impact candidates during the hiring process.

Personality testing is expected to be a $6.5 billion industry by 2027.

About 80 million people complete a personality test each year.

80% of Fortune 500 companies use personality assessments for hiring, despite concerns about their validity.

The MBTI was originally designed for personal growth and self-awareness, not for hiring purposes.

The test sorts people into 16 personality types, but these categories are not scientifically supported.

Many experts argue that personality assessments should not be used in hiring due to their lack of validity.

The test's creators, Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers, pioneered the MBTI in 1945, but it has since been heavily criticized.

Some experts argue that personality assessments can play a beneficial role in hiring, but only if used in conjunction with other, more valid evaluation methods.

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