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Have others experienced panic attacks as a reason to quit smoking marijuana?

The psychoactive compound in cannabis, THC, can affect the brain's neurotransmitters, including increasing dopamine levels, which may contribute to anxiety and panic attacks in some individuals.

Cannabis hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is a condition that can cause intense nausea, vomiting, and dehydration, and is often mistaken for a panic attack.

CBD, another compound found in cannabis, has been shown to have anxiolytic effects and may help to reduce the risk of panic attacks in some users.

The risk of experiencing a panic attack after consuming cannabis may be higher with edibles, as the onset of effects is delayed and can result in higher overall levels of THC in the body.

The method of consumption can also affect the likelihood of experiencing a panic attack.

Smoking or vaporizing cannabis may produce effects more quickly, allowing users to better gauge their tolerance and potentially reducing the risk of panic attacks.

The risk of experiencing a panic attack after consuming cannabis may also be influenced by individual genetic factors, including the presence of certain genetic variants related to anxiety and stress.

The potency of cannabis, measured by the concentration of THC, can also affect the likelihood of experiencing a panic attack.

Higher potency cannabis may produce more intense effects and increase the risk of anxiety and panic.

The environment and context in which cannabis is consumed can also contribute to the risk of panic attacks.

Consuming cannabis in a comfortable, familiar setting with trusted individuals may reduce anxiety and the risk of panic attacks.

Tolerance to the anxiety-inducing effects of THC can develop over time, and regular users may be less likely to experience panic attacks than infrequent users.

Certain strains of cannabis, particularly those high in CBD and low in THC, may be less likely to cause anxiety and panic attacks.

Some research suggests that the terpenes, aromatic compounds found in cannabis, may also play a role in the anxiety-inducing effects of THC, with some terpenes potentially reducing anxiety and others increasing it.

The endocannabinoid system, a network of receptors and chemicals in the body that regulates mood, pain, and other functions, may also play a role in the risk of panic attacks after consuming cannabis.

While panic attacks after consuming cannabis are often attributed to THC, some research suggests that the compound may also have anxiolytic effects in low doses, and that the risk of panic attacks may be more closely related to individual factors and the setting in which cannabis is consumed.

While panic attacks after consuming cannabis can be distressing, they are typically not harmful and resolve on their own within a few hours.

However, if panic attacks become frequent or severe, it may be advisable to seek professional help.

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