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How can I manage panic attacks during exercise and eventually overcome them to achieve a healthy relationship with physical activity?

The "fight or flight" response is activated during a panic attack, triggering symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, and dizziness.

Exercise-induced panic attacks (EIPAs) can occur even in individuals without a history of panic disorder.

Gradual progression of exercise intensity can help prevent EIPAs by reducing the shock to the body.

Identifying and avoiding triggers, such as intense physical exertion or exercising in warm weather, can minimize the risk of EIPAs.

Deep breathing techniques can help reduce symptoms of EIPAs by lowering heart rate and promoting relaxation.

Medication may be prescribed under a healthcare professional's guidance for individuals experiencing EIPAs.

Recovery from an EIPA typically takes 5-10 minutes, and symptoms often subside on their own.

Exercise-induced panic attacks are triggered by the body's response to physical exertion, not the exercise itself.

Individuals with a history of panic disorder may be more prone to EIPAs, but anyone can experience them.

Exercise-induced panic attacks can occur during any form of physical activity, including walking, running, or cycling.

In some cases, EIPAs can be mistaken for heart attacks or other medical emergencies.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment for managing EIPAs.

Combining CBT with aerobic exercise has shown to enhance the effectiveness of treating EIPAs.

Exercise-induced panic attacks can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life and mental health.

Addressing and managing EIPAs is crucial for maintaining a healthy relationship with physical activity.

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