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What are some effective ways to help a child overcome binge eating habits?

Binge eating disorder is the most common eating disorder in children, affecting around 1 in 5 kids and teens.

Children with binge eating disorder often eat in secret, feeling guilty and ashamed, and may hide evidence of food wrappers or containers.

Kids with binge eating disorder are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem.

Binge eating can lead to weight-related problems, such as obesity, and also increase the risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

Family-based therapy is an effective treatment for child binge eating, involving the whole family in the recovery process.

Parents play a crucial role in modeling healthy eating habits, as kids often mimic their parents' behavior.

Encouraging physical activity and exercise can help reduce binge eating symptoms, as exercise releases endorphins, which improve mood.

Mindfulness-based interventions, such as yoga and meditation, can help children develop healthier relationships with food and their bodies.

Avoid labeling foods as "good" or "bad," as this can lead to unhealthy relationships with food; instead, focus on promoting balanced eating habits.

Kids with binge eating disorder often have difficulty recognizing and expressing their emotions, which can contribute to binge eating; teaching emotional regulation skills can help.

The FDA has approved the use of Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) for adults with moderate to severe binge eating disorder, but this medication is not approved for children.

Children with binge eating disorder often have co-occurring mental health conditions, such as anxiety or depression, which need to be addressed in treatment.

A healthy body image is crucial in overcoming binge eating, as it helps reduce body dissatisfaction and promotes self-acceptance.

Family-based therapy can also improve parent-child relationships, leading to a more supportive environment for the child's recovery.

Early detection and intervention are crucial, as binge eating disorder often develops in childhood and adolescence, and may persist into adulthood if left untreated.

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