Get a psychological profile on anyone - identify traits and risks of mental illness. (Get started for free)

What constitutes a binge and how can I determine whether my eating habits have become binge-like, especially when eating alone versus in social situations?

Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder, affecting approximately 3% of US adults.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), binge drinking is defined as a pattern of drinking that raises the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08% or higher.

This typically occurs when a woman consumes four or more drinks or a man consumes five or more drinks within a 2-hour period.

Binge eating is often referred to as a pattern of consuming large amounts of food in a short period, often accompanied by feelings of guilt, shame, and emotional distress.

Binge eating disorder is a serious eating disorder characterized by recurring episodes of binge eating, which can lead to significant distress, impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning, and a marked degree of psychological difficulty.

In the context of binge drinking, there is no specific definition of what constitutes a "binge", but rather a definition based on the amount of alcohol consumed within a 2-hour period.

Binge drinking is not necessarily a sign of alcoholism, which is a dependency on alcohol consumption.

Binge drinking can lead to acute harm, such as blackouts and overdoses, as well as increase the likelihood of unsafe sexual behavior and sexually transmitted infections.

College students have higher binge drinking rates than their non-college peers, with nearly 30% of young adults aged 18-25 participating in past-month binge drinking.

Binge drinking appears to double the risk of alcohol-related consequences compared to typical drinking.

Students who binge drank in the past 12 months are more likely to experience alcohol-related consequences, such as hangovers, memory lapses, and poor grades.

Women are more likely to experience guilt, shame, and emotional distress after binge eating, while men are more likely to experience shame and emotional distress.

Binge eating can lead to physical health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, as well as mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety.

Binge drinking can lead to neurocognitive impairment, including reduced gray matter in the brain, particularly in areas responsible for executive function, decision-making, and emotional regulation.

Binge eating and binge drinking can both be treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy, which helps individuals identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors.

Get a psychological profile on anyone - identify traits and risks of mental illness. (Get started for free)

Related

Sources